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Vacqueyras AOC

I’ve been taking the Rhône Valley “Master Level” program through the Wine Scholar Guild for the past few months, so lately I’ve been completely immersed in all things Rhône related.  Which is not a bad place to be!

Although I’m confident in my knowledge of the Northern Rhône, the South hasn’t come quite as easily.

Maybe it’s because there are about 27 permitted grape varieties in the South compared to only four in the North. Or because the Southern Rhône represents a whopping 95% of the area’s total production. But it’s likely due to the fact that one of my best wine days ever occurred last Fall when my hubby & I did a private all day tour of Côte Rôtie and Condrieu. Places I’ve visited in person tend to stick better in my brain.

Whatever the reason, I decided to pick a Southern Rhône Cru at random (congrats Vacqueyras!) and do a more detailed outline on that region. At least then I’m guaranteed to nail exam questions on this area. 😉 Here’s the Vacqueyras outline.

[Note: There was some conflicting information among sources while I was putting together this outline. Since I’m taking the exam through the WSG, I went with their materials – even if they differed from GuildSomm. As a general rule though, I prefer and trust GuildSomm as a resource pretty much above everything else.]

Discrepancy between WSG and GS:

Rosé required blend

Per WSG: Grenache – minimum 60%, Mourvédre & Cinsault – minimum 15%

Per GS: Grenache, Cinsault, Syrah, and Mourvèdre (but no single variety may account for more than 80%), maximum 10% other varietals allowed for rouge wines

Ancient Lakes AVA

It’s the waning weeks of summer, but we’ve (thankfully!) still had plenty of sunny and toasty days here in the PNW. Although I drink whites consistently year-round, it’s during this time of year that I often reach for them to refresh and cool down. I don’t want anything heavy or serious. Just pour me a crisp, uncomplicated porch pounder and I’m good to sit on the deck (or in my bedroom with A/C) for hours.

I love acid bomb whites. Gramercy Cellars’ Picpoul (which appropriately translates to “lip stinger”) is one of my favorite summer staples. Both wines below are reminiscent of this wine, but both really push the boundaries of acidity. They’re on the edge of being too much.

Since I had these wines back to back, and noticed that they were both from the same region, I was curious as to why these had such high acidity. What is it about Ancient Lakes that produces such bright & zesty white wines? What else does this region produce? What makes this region special and unique?

central_WA_ancient_lakes
Ancient Lake AVA boundaries

Palencia Albariño 2016, Ancient Lakes AVA. 12.5% abv. Pale lemon. Aromas of lemon, chalk, and wet stones. Lighter bodied, high acidity with flavors of lemon, tart yellow pear and lime zest. This is a super easy to drink wine, but not necessarily one to sit and ponder. It’s fairly simple. Zippy and refreshing.

Wines

Efeste ‘Feral’ Evergreen Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc 2016, Ancient Lakes AVA. 12.5% abv. More of a pale lemon-green hue on this wine. On the nose, grapefruit, grass, lime zest and herbal notes. Same on the palate, but with a touch of salinity. And holy acidity!

Here’s my outline on the Ancient Lakes AVA – an area you definitely want to check out if you like crisp whites, and reds with a good dose of acidity as well.